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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> the u.n. envoy to syria holds talks with president bashar al- assad and hopes to find a solution to end the violence. hello. the other top stories from al jazeera -- another insider attack in afghanistan. the u.s. contractor is killed. plus -- india's prime minister appeals for calm after a second day of violent street protests. plus, bringing life to the desert. qatar brings ca hopes for those struggling to grow their own food. syria's president bashar al- assad says his government will do whatever it can to end the crisis in syria. his comments on state tv followed a meeting of the u.n. peace envoy to syria lakdar brahimi. he also says he is cooperating with lakdar brahimi, who is on a two-day visit. it coincides with a missile strike. scores of civilians killed in the attack. in the northern city of aleppo rebel fighters say they captured a military base. russia's foreign minister says he received guarantees from president assad he will not use chemical weapons against rebels. >> i met president assad and we exchanged views on the next steps that can be taken to move forward.
american human rights law is hurtin relations. >> no end in sight after nearly two years of war in syria. we will meet one man who spent the last year trying to keep his family alive. the first in a president elected -- first female president elect. for 50 years, algeria has been waiting for an apology from france. the french president addressed the parliament a few hours ago. this was how the president responded to date. >> i recognize the suffering here that colonization inflicted on the algerian people. amongst these sufferings, there was a massacre in other places o f algeria. these are in the minds of the people but also of the french people. >> following that speech for us was our correspondent who explains now why president hollande avoided a more specific apology. >> it seems as though he is taking the route of truth than apologies or using the word sorry, because that would be very difficult for french people to swallow because after all suffering. these were people whose parents, grandparents, and great grandparents were born in algeria. president hollande would have alienated
an invasion of the golan heights and the east banks of the suez by syria and egypt. the surprise attacks came early this morning in the air and on the ground. >> surprise attacks. in october 1973, as richard nixon is crumbling beneath the weight of watergate, our ally israel is simultaneously surprise attacked by egypt from the west and by syria from the north. after initially being caught off guard by the attacks, israel eventually takes the upper hand. they are not only able to defend their own borders. they go on offense. they drive to within 65 miles of cairo and just 25 miles of the syrian capital of damascus. israel is on the move. and then something extraordinary happens. for the first time since the cuban missile crisis in the 1960s the united states military moves to defcon 3. for some perspective, the only other time we have been at defcon 3 since then is on 9/11. this is something that almost never happens. and when it does, it is historic and it is historically scary. and when it happened in 1973, the order to go to defcon three was not issued by president nixon. he was apparently
to state conflict, a conflict between israel and jordan, israel and syria and israel and egypt. this became a new conflict that emerged, one between israel and the palestinians. before 1967, you really didn't hear about the palestinians. it's not by accident a year after the war ended in 1968, the p.l.o., under yasser arafat, emerges as this powerful force in the arab world. we have been living with that as well. 1967 war was also inaugurated the strategic relationship between the united states and israel. people forget that israel fought the 1967 war not with american arms but with french weaponry. france was their principal ally. before 1967, one israeli prime minister one time for one hour had visited the white house. it wasn't israel's founder. june 1964. today ariel sharon or any israeli prime minister comes to washington, it's obvious he will march into the white house. that began that very, very close relationship, that cooperation began in the aftermath of 1967, not before that. >> as you acknowledge, one more book on the six-day war. there have been a lot of them. what do you have
to our viewers on public television and around the globe. the government of syria appears to be losing the confidence of its most important factor. russia's envoy for medalist affairs says the rebels are gaining control -- envoy for middle east affairs says the rebels are gaining control. washington congratulated the kremlin for waking up to reality. >> the aftermath of a bombing in a damascus suburb. syrian official media said a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in this district to the southwest of the total, and that at least half of the casualties were women and children. "we were going to school when the explosion took place. i do not know anything about my parents. they may have died." this man says the victims were all students, or going to their places of work. after the explosion, the ground was full of bodies. the state news agency has blamed the violence on terrorists, its name for the rebels intensifying attacks on the government. this was the latest in a string of bombings in and around damascus. for the first time, russia has acknowledged the possibility of
.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments based on intelligence any more than that. megyn: conor powell covering syria life from our mideast bureau tod
civil war in syria. the hearing on the military conflict in eastern congo. later, a discussion about the middle east security. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognize the main syrian opposition groups as the legitimate representative of this country's people. earlier today political adviser to the syrian american council and a turkish journalist reporting on this serious civil war at the new america foundation. both men recently returned from the country and say the west can do more to help the syrian people. >> welcome, everyone. wellcome also to know c-span and its audience. very excited about today's events because we have two people with those who have recently come from syria and are able to give us an insider perspective, something that is hard to come by in the context of syria. to my far right is mohammed ghanem. he received his bachelor's degree in english literature as well as his graduate degree in translation from damascus university. he went on to aaron a master's degree in peace building in conflict transformation from the center of justice and peace
-state solution. >>> hundreds of thousands of refugees have fled the conflict in syria. some are palestinians being displaced for a second time in their lives, having already left their nation's home for syria. if a growing number are now seeking safety in lebanon. >> this border crossing has new arrivals almost every minute. nearly two years, it was city's fleeing. now it is palestinians coming from the refugee camp where fighting has forced thousands of people to move. the refugees have no specific place to go to. this camp is one of three refugee camps where the palestinians coming from syria are being received. up to 550 families have arrived in the past few days. we had to go from house to house looking for them. most are staying with relatives. this person and his 12-member family. two of his daughters were awarded an attack in july. -- they were wounded in attack in july. >> we fled from our house as fast as we could, escaping through the window because the door was being hit by shells. i was worried for my children and women. there was constant shelling around us. that was the only wa
syria and israel. the security council decided on wednesday to extend the forces mandate by another six months. commanders have rotated units of 50 self-defense personnel through the mission since 1996. they have been responsible for transportation and logistics. japanese government officials say they will pull sdf members back next month because they are worried about safety. their mission was scheduled to wrap up in the leersd . >>> the leaders of india have agreed to work together. india's prime minister met with representatives from the ten member association of southeast asian nations. the two sides are committed to cooperation and the safety of sea lanes. >> indeed, aussian nations should negotiate for a peaceful settlement of maritime dispute in accordance with international law. >> vietnam and the phillipines, both aussian members, are in dispute with china over items in the south china sea. >>> putin has voiced his hope with government under shinzo abe. he wants to settle a long-time dispute and conclude a peace treaty. putin spoke to more than 1,200 domestic and foreign report
to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go through, the country's child rights commissioner says that those kids are going to stay in russia. so why are the russians doing this? the ban is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed tw
and international envoy to syria are warning that syria's civil war is threatening the fragile stability of the mideast. u.n. arab league envoy rahimi met with russian foreign minister lavrov in moscow today. they're trying to bring the regime and rebels to the bargaining table. >> you know, the only alternative is really help for political process. then we have got all of us to work ceaselessly for particular causes. it is difficult. it is very complicated. but there is no other choice. >> but despite the international appeal for a peaceful political transition, fighting continues to rage in syria. syrian opposition activists say at least 88 people have been killed just today. >>> the senate has approved a bill extending secret eavesdropping overseas. the measure is headed to president obama who's expected to sign it. cnn's brian todd takes a closer look at the controversial foreign surveillance act. >> reporter: he ordered it just after 9/11, and it became one of the most controversial tactics used by former president george w. bush and his security team to fight the war on terror. the
, and some of them in the foreign policy area are very relevant today. for instance, over syria. we understand that. we hope that at recent events, syria may be moving russia and the united states closer in terms of our thinking. but it is only a good thing to bring russia into a rules-based system with mechanisms for peaceful, transparent dispute resolution. there is no debate. and i think the chair knows this full well, that the very tragic and senseless death of anticorruption lawyer sergei magnitsky who died while in russian custody, that those events are simply unacceptable. they're appalling. and it highlights a human rights problem that has grown in its scope, not diminished. it's one we hope to be able to resolve with good relationships and good discussions. senator cardin, a sponsor of that legislation, in the house of the senate is going to speak shortly about it, and i will leave him to describe in full the nature of that particular component of this bill. suffice it to say, that human rights -- democracy and transparency activists in russia favor the passage of construct
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)